Obituary Format


Suggested Paid Obituary Format Information

Please email the completed obituary to our funeral home at: info@clarkassociatesfuneralhome.com

  • Date(s) to Run: _______________________
  • Name of Deceased, Age
  • Of (town/city)
  • A resident for ___ years
  • Date of death, Place of death
  • Date and place of birth and parents names
  • Education: High School, College and degrees attained
  • Veteran Status: include branch of Service and War or dates served
  • Occupation (before retirement) including name of employer and location
  • Name of organizations where a member
  • Personal qualities, talents, hobbies or interests of the deceased
  • Family survivors: spouse, children, grandchildren, brothers and sisters and city, state of each
  • Full name, mailing address or website of organization for Memorial Contributions

The Funeral Home will add the following information:

  • Times and Date of Visiting Hours
  • Time, Date and Place of Funeral, Memorial Service or Mass of Christian Burial
  • Place of interment or cremation

1. The Journal News: obituary@lohud.com
2. The Record Review: recordreview@optonline.net
3. Lewisboro Ledger: ledger@acorn-online.com
4. Somers Record: somersrecord@halstonmedia.com
5. NY Times: nytimes@mediasalesplus.com


The format for obituaries can vary depending on whether it is for the New York Times, the Journal News or for the website. Here are examples of each:

New York Times Paid Death Notice

($56.00/line for one day, $62.00/line for two days, $1100.00 additional for photo)

Clark, William H. , “Bill” 95, of Katonah, NY formerly of Brooklyn, on Monday, January 10th 2011 Proprietor of Clark Electrical Service in Mt. Kisco . Beloved husband of Roseanne (nee Voisard), devoted father of Paul (Jane) of Somers, NY, David (Susan) of Pawling, NY, Marianne (Joseph) Rast and Bradley (Becky) of Tonawanda, NY. Loving grandfather of four, great grandfather of two. Dear brother of Catherine and Paul Calteaux. Friends may call at Clark Associates Funeral Home, 4 Woods Bridge Rd., Katonah, NY on Friday, January 14th 2-4 and 7-9 PM. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Mary’s RC Church, Katonah, NY , Saturday, January 15th, 10:00 AM. Internment to follow at Ferncliff Cemetery, Hartsdale, NY In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Tour de Cure, 315 Alberta Drive, Suite 102, Amherst, NY 14226

Journal News Paid Obituary and Website

($16.35/line)

Clark, William H. , “Bill” 95, of Katonah, NY formerly of Brooklyn, died Monday, January 10th 2011 at Northern Westchester Hospital. Bill was born on August 30th 1916 in Dusseldorf, Germany to the late Fred and Maize( Heinz ) Clark He emigrated to the United States at the age of 15 years. Bill was a U.S. Army veteran and served in the Pacific Theatre during WW II, and received the Silver Star. He was a graduate of Cornell University receiving his BA in Electronic Engineering. Bill was the proprietor of Clark Electrical Service in Mt. Kisco for many years and retired in 1985. He was a charter member and past president of the Somers Rotary Club. Bill is the beloved husband of Roseanne (nee Voisard) and is the loving father of Paul (Jane) of Somers, NY, David (Susan) of Pawling, NY, Marianne (Joseph) Rast and Bradley (Becky) of Tonawanda, NY. He is the devoted grandfather of Rosemary, Jay, Rodney and Bruce and two great granddaughters, Shannon and Cindy.
Bill is the brother of Catherine and Paul Calteaux of Punkshire Corners, NY and is also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends may call at Clark Associates Funeral Home, 4 Woods Bridge Rd., Katonah, NY on Friday, January 14th from 2-4 and 7-9 PM. A Mass of Christian Burial will be at St. Mary’s RC Church 117 Valley Rd, Katonah, NY on Saturday, January 15th at 10:00 AM. Internment will follow at Ferncliff Cemetery 280 Secor Rd, Hartsdale, NY 10530. In Memoriums may be made to Tour de Cure, 315 Alberta Drive, Suite 102, Amherst, NY 14226

Journal News Free Death Notice and Website

Clark, William H ., “Bill”
95, of Katonah, NY on Monday, January 10th 2011.
Clark Associates Funeral Home, Katonah, NY 914-232-3033



Eulogies

Giving a meaningful, moving eulogy can be a nerve-wracking situation for even the most accomplished public speaker, but it need not be.  How can you summarize somebody’s life in a few short minutes, while being both somber and funny at the same time? Writing and delivering a eulogy is a therapeutic tool to help deal with your grief, and being chosen to give a eulogy is an honor and should be treated that way.  Here are some tips for writing and delivering an eloquent and memorable eulogy.

  • Gather information.  Talk with family members, close friends and co-workers to get important information on the deceased.  Some important information to include in the eulogy is the persons family and other close relationships, their education/career, hobbies or special interests, places the person lived or traveled too, and any special accomplishments they had.
  • Organize your thoughts.  Jot down your ideas by whatever means are most comfortable and familiar to you.  Create an outline of your speech, and fill in the information that you gathered about the person.
  • Write it down.  This is not a toast at a wedding where you can make off the cuff remarks, and you should not ad lib a eulogy.  Writing it all down allows you to include and remember every detail you wanted in your eulogy.  When you bring a copy your eulogy to the podium make sure it is easy to read, print it out in a large font, or if it hand-written leave a few spaces between the lines.  Keep in mind your time constraints, it’s best to keep things on the short side, especially if there are other speakers.
  • Review and Revise.  Your first draft will not be the last.  When you think you are done, sleep on it and look it over in the morning when it is fresh again, that will be the time to make any necessary revisions.
  • Practice, Practice, Practice.  Read over your eulogy several times in order to become familiar with it.  Practice in front of a mirror, read it over to some friends or family and have them give you feedback.  Become familiar with your speech so you can recite it without making it look like you’re reading from a script.  The more you practice the more comfortable you will be. 
  • Make them laugh, but be respectful.  A funeral is not a roast, however there is room for humor in your eulogy.  Fondly remember a story about the person that everyone can relate too.  Keep it appropriate, there will be children and the elderly there that may not share the same sense of humor.  Laughter is truly the best medicine, and some well placed humor will help people cope, and will bring back fond memories of the deceased.
  • Don’t be afraid to show emotion.  Funerals are an extremely emotional event, nobody expects you not to shed a few tears.  However, if you feel that you will be too strongly overcome by your emotions, have a back-up plan in place where someone you trust can deliver the eulogy for you.  Give them a copy well in advance if you feel this could be an issue.
  • Have a glass of water as well as tissues handy.